Meet:: Jayesslee

Youtube Sensation “Jayesslee”!

 

Gangnam Style- PSY

 

 

Jayesslee is the group name of the two twins Sonia and Janet. The name is “Jay” for J and “Ess” for S and Lee, their last name. The girls are Korean but were born and raised in Sydney, Australia. Janice and Sonia started music in church and got influences from worship music.

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Jayesslee started posting their videos online in 2008, and the cover of “Officially Missing You” (17 million views) by Tamia boost their followers. Thanks to Youtube, their cover videos went viral and they are now number one most subscribed youtube channel in Australia by reaching one million subscribers.

Officially Missing You-Tamia 

 

With their popularity, they covered more songs like… Jessie J’s Price Tag (20million views), Maroon 5’s Payphone (38million views) . They uploaded PSY’s Gangname Style and it has more than 35 million views!!

Payphone-Maroon 5

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The girls have been performing at weddings, colleges and university shows. The duo flew to LA and had their first concert in 2010. Ever since then, they have had shows in the United States, Canada, and Asian countries like Thailand, Malaysia and Singapore. Their shows are not huge, but get sold out with more than 3500 fans. The girls are inspired to sing and perform about their personal experiences. They aspire to be artists who send out positive messages of hope and freedom through their music.

“We didn’t ever think our platform and success would reach to this capacity and popularity. It’s truly an honour and blessing to see so many fans and people all over the world accept us and admire our music. We thank all of you from the bottom of our hearts.” – Janice & Sonia

Janice and Sonia released few tracks on iTunes & Spotify as well with their studio recorded versions of Officially Missing You, Payphone, Dare You To Move and more.
I just love them. I can listen to them all day!

My favorite!

Dare You To Move- Switchfoot

 

Check out Jayeslee on Youtube, facebook, twitter and itunes! 

Youtube
Facebook
Twitter : @jayessleemusic 
Itunes

Artist Strategy: Growing Up

Artist Growth

As a musician, I’m familiar with the mindset. Over the years my own musical tastes have shifted, developed, and broadened with the advent of new influences from particular players or entire genres of music. These influences have shaped my creative capabilities into something more eclectic, more expressive, and more-so me. But as artists, we aren’t ever quite satisfied with who we are creatively; there’s always room to grow.

Growth from the perspective of an artist commercially is more complicated. There are a few additional barriers between point A and point B when a musician, or painter, or filmmaker attempts to expand as a service. Without getting into Porters Five Forces, Clustering, or SWOT analyses, we can agree that, generally, making it isn’t as simple as locking oneself away in a shed and repping real book charts until your chops melt.

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One of the most difficult challenges to overcome – the one that most clearly separates professionals and novices in the industry – is the continued expansion of one’s fanbase. The first hundred ‘likes’ may be easy, as they’re often sourced by facebook friends and family out of complicity. The subsequent hundred or two can be earned by playing shows, but the growth regularly stops here. It stops when the same people are coming to your shows and you’ve no more facebook friends to hound. This is the wall that condemned your ska band to high school battle of the bands performances. This is the wall that’s keeping 99% of singer-songwriters off the playlist of my younger sister.

This first few hundred cooperating individuals are what I call an artist’s first sphere of fans – those with whom the artist has personally interacted with in exchange for support. The exponential growth beyond this point and the concept of “blowing up” all come down to an artist’s ability to mobilize these fans to help out. Once the members of an artist’s initial sphere reach out and share to their own personal spheres, that initial hundred becomes a thousand and, with any luck (or talent… right?), more.

Progress-circles

I’m going to ask you to really dig deep to remember this next artist. While he’s phased out of the nation’s musical lexicon since his prime, he’s a perfect example of the difference between Nicki Minaj  and Laybelle.

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His name is Psy and he used to be a pretty big deal.

Psy’s initial following – his fans in South Korea or the savvy goldminers of YouTube who stumbled across his video for Gangnam Style – were quick to relay his work to their own personal networks. His first sphere expanded to a second sphere, which expanded to a third, etc. – outwards to over a billion YouTube views. It helps that his video was optimized for virality, since without something so damn endearing like a round man dancing like a horse it wouldn’t have merited the share in the first place. Nevertheless, from this example we can learn that without something a bit more tangible than a piece of music, it’s quite hard to turn your ‘likes’ into passionate foot-soldiers.

There are no explicit rules to accomplishing this, though there are a few pre-requisites. Firstly, be very sure of what is it you’re trying to say. Be able to say it without needing to take a breath in the middle. One of my favorite examples comes from a songwriter I worked with back in Boston – Dylan Ewen. He said this about his album:

It’s about real life being a bummer, girls that suck, and porn.  I hope you enjoy it.  I really like Bob Dylan.”

Truly beautiful.

From there, you can set out to create something tangible, whether it be a story, a video, a logo, a t-shirt, anything you can achieve. The second imperative is creativity! Keep in mind, when you give someone a cool thing, chances are they want people to know they have it. If it’s something that they can give away without losing their own, they want to be known as the one who found it and the one who gave it away.

It’s something to consider – while a truly great song can be your ticket, sometimes it takes a little something provocative to get things rolling. Be inspired, be creative, and consider how you can add something tangible to what you do.

Artist Strategy: “Story Time”

Strategy

What separates Deadmau5 from Dyro, or Rihanna from Rox? Why do we recognize certain names – certain brands – so well and others maybe not so much? It’s safe to say that talent wise, these artists are comparable; their production or vocal chops alone aren’t enough to propel them to the front of the minds of music consumers. So what is it? What makes Joel and Robyn different and what leads listeners to go to them first for a music fix? If it’s not all about the final product, then why do we as independent artists tend to lock ourselves away in dark bedrooms, littered with discarded bags of Doritos, painstakingly self-producing an EP that embodies months or even years of deliberation and practice, only to post it online to a tepid-at-best response from friends and family? What can we do differently?

We can strategize, of course!

Artists are quick to consider independent and major label business practices decidedly incompatible – but there’s a lot to be learned from the success of the stars and it doesn’t mean lip-syncing or dressing up in a space suit [unless you’re into that].

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Intro To Consumer Choice 

The kind academic community of marketing scholars offers an analysis of consumer decision-making that we can apply to the music business. It’s a series of educated guesses regarding why buyers buy what they buy. They have identified a “need,” either functional [serving a practical issue] or psychological [satisfying a perceived desire], as the origin of purchase decisions. These needs include anything from hunger to clothing, sleep to self-actualization and the majority of which can be satisfied quite easily and simply. That is hardly ever the case; what’s known as a ‘want’ complicates the equation and it is that ‘want’ position that music competes for. Since, statistically speaking, the reclusive approach to professional artistry doesn’t tend to achieve that position, it takes strategy.

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The main problem lies in artists’ product-centric vs. buyer-centric approaches towards strategy. Ever since Henry Ford’s mantra of ‘any color, so long as it’s black’ dissolved into a sea of possibilities and customizable options, consumers have had the final say. Competition between businesses [or in our case, between artists] encouraged the development of ‘different’, of ‘unique’. The pool of options grew and grew and correlated with a growing importance of consumer choice considerations. Consumers are more empowered than ever. As a result, a savvy business [and a savvy artist] looks just as much to what consumers want as to why they want it.

Strategists that understand this are able to do some very interesting and effective things. For now, I’ll discuss a creative approach to pro-consumer strategy that’s been quite successful for those who have pulled it off.

So, relax. It’s story time.

Trent Reznor

In 2007, Trent Reznor began an incredible promotional campaign for the Nine Inch Nails album, Zero. To begin, he circulated a concert t-shirt [seen below] with a hidden URL included in the shirt’s lettering; his clever fans quickly found the website – “iamtryingtobelieve.com”.

Iamtryingtobelievetourshirt

The dilapidated looking site, which portrays a world in which the government sedates and controls the population by invading the water supply with a psychoactive drug called “Parepin”, initiated an extensive network of “eerie voice mail, Web sites, Morse code clues hidden in MP3s and messages buried deep within music videos” all leading up to the release of the band’s record. The promotion brought together fans, created an entirely alternative reality, garnered a massive amount of “earned media”, and made Year Zero one of the most memorable experiences a Nine Inch Nails fan could have.

Application

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If there’s to take away from Reznor’s creativity, it’s a lesson in creating value through telling a story. As an independent artist, one may not be in a position to stage an extravagant movement, she can work to engage her fans and involve them in what he or she does whether it be consistently live streaming rehearsals or sharing updates on recording projects. There needs to be something to carry the music – a story, a mindset, a video [ahem… Psy/Baauer] – and augmenting the hard work of a self-produced EP with something more tangible can be the difference between two choices. It can be the difference between Deadmau5 and Dyro.

http://www.mtv.com/news/articles/1554530/nine-inch-nails-year-zero-preview.jhtml

http://www.ninwiki.com/I_Am_Trying_To_Believe

Gangnam Style : First video to reach 1,000,000,000 on youtube?!?

Gangnam Style is now officially the most viewed video on youtube. As I am writing this post, there is a war of comments happening on youtube between Gangnamstylers and Beliebers… Apparently Psy just passed Bieber somewhere around 803 million today. Hold on a second, last time I check this video a few weeks ago I thought it was around 500 million. How did Gangnam Style grow so fast? Is it really going to be the first video to reach 1,000,000,000 views?!? Let’s take a look at the charts of the top 3 most viewed videos on youtube.

3rd with 624,277,481 : Jennifer Lopez – On The Floor ft. Pitbull

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Amazing score with over 600,000,000 for Jennifer Lopez but this video is 1 year and 8 months old. It will still take about a year to reach a billion.

2nd with 803,697,418 : Justin Bieber – Baby ft. Ludacris

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This video is 2 years and 9 months old. We can see that the curves of Lopez and Bieber are pretty similar and slowly decreasing.

1st with 805,158,668 : Psy – Gangnam style (강남스타일) M/V

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This video however is only 4 months old! After going through an amazing rise of views in August, this curve is heading straight to 1 billion! Psy is getting roughly 9,000,000 views per day with his hit song. If that rate remains constant, he will reach a billion views in less than 1 month. Actually when I started writing this post about 2 hours ago he was around 803 million, and now when I’m ending this post he’s around 805 million. This world is crazy. Some people say that Psy will be a one hit wonder. Well with this world record he’s about to reach, it’s going to be a while before we forget him…

Are we at a stage where Asian music is going to become internationally more popular than western music?

New trend in China, V-pop?!

Recently, Vietnam band- HKT made a cover of a Maydays’ song but sang in Vietnamese called “错错错” had successfully replaced the song “Gangnam Style” by Korean singer PSY. They created a buzz at China biggest social network- Weibo (3 billion users) due to their weird hairstyle and been well known in China just within a week after they sign up the Weibo and posted their music video on it.

(Cover Mayday song “错错错“)

HKT, formed by three 90’s late young mans and had released 5 albums within 6 years in Vietnam. Although some of their songs has been on Vietnam chart but been criticized by local as “shitty music”.  However, they realized that China is a big market so they utilized the power of the social network (Weibo) by weird hairstyle in those music video that they covered other famous Asian artists songs and been insanely reposted by Weibo user for their friend to make fun on it. They successfully became the top search term at every Chinese website such as Baidu, Weibo, QQ and the hot topic of many forums, and became the new trend in China.

I still remember my China friend came and visited me last week, she suddenly mentioned about this band during one of our conversations and asked me to watch it through weibo because she thought those guys were crazy, weird and funny. How powerful was the word of mouth through social network, could leads a band or people been well known in a short period of time.

My conclusion is, if you want to enter China market, why don’t create a topic by become weird or acted weird so you could get Chinese people attention immediately and become well known then you could started to promote your own music to the audience in China such as HTK turn into normal looks after they had created the trend. However, you still needed luck and good timing such as some famous artist in Weibo repost your video. Anyway, Good Luck~

(Their current Korea Style)

Reference:

http://news.powerapple.com/ent_and_sport/2012/11/19/853009.html