Why Twitter is Necessary in Today’s Music Industry

Twitter

It’s a bird, it’s a plane, it’s… a completely irrelevant thought that sounds like a diary entry!  Yes, that’s Twitter to the common eye.  Believe me, for the longest time I thought that Twitter was the one of the lamest things to ever hit the music industry.  I couldn’t wrap my head around it.  Why?

Well for one, I always thought that Facebook was a more varied version of it.  Why should you be limited to 140 characters to post, not have thumbnail displayed photo previews, why not have extra pages like downloads or band pages, and why not just freakin’ have some privacy?  I mean, what ever happened to the mysterious rock star?  The icon that was either so DIY or so busy that the only time you could see them and hear them talk was that magical hour and a half on stage?  That was a rock and roll icon to me.  They were a mystery until you had to go out to their live show.

Unfortunately, I got slapped in the face with reality when I found out that this is 2012, and the Backstreet Boys are way past the Backstreet Men phase, making me one old bastard for the times.  It came time that I had to embrace this fancy new technology of the youth, and I fumbled for a while until I figured out it’s pure gold in today’s industry

You could say I have no clue what the @#$% I'm doing.

You could say I have no clue what the @#$% I’m doing.

1)  Twitter maintains your relevance in every day.  We live in a generation of instant-gratification.  If you can’t appease your blood thirsty shirt-ripping music-pillaging hounds of fans, you can sure bet they’re going to go and feast on the next target they see since you’re clearly not putting out.  Before you know it, your fans forget about who you are just because you’re not updating them on a day to day basis.  You’d be surprised how true it is.

2) You can create a short statement swift to the point that’ll be immediately received by all.  While 140 characters seems constricting, it actually aids you, the reader, or your fans.  How often will your fans stop what they’re doing to read that giant Shakespearean essay you posted on Facebook?  Most likely, they’ll just skip through it; in fact they probably won’t even see it.  Twitter guarantees your tweets will appear in the streams of your followers (Unless they’re following an insane amount of tweeters), whereas Facebook posts actually have never reached more than an average of 15% of their fans.

Don't worry, we're not "liking" your photo of breakfast because we hate you, we just don't give a shit about you enough to show up in our feed.

Don’t worry, it’s not that we’re not “liking” your photo of breakfast because we hate you, we just don’t give a shit about you enough to have you show up in our feed.

3)  Searching buzzes on Twitter is more effective than using Google.  Please re-read that so you don’t assume I just said Twitter is better than Google for information.  I said searching for buzzes: do you know how many people tweet about the silliest things you can’t find on Google?  When Facebook was down, Google wasn’t telling me anything.  But all I had to do was search “Facebook” on Twitter; and I’ll tell you, Twitter exploded about it.  It’s not that Google fails or anything of the sort, it’s just that the way the search engine is configured, Twitter sifts through much less  and more relevant information to produce its Tweet results as opposed to Google.

4) In addition to #3, you can create the buzz yourself.  Trends and re-tweets are very helpful in that the fans do some of the promotion for you.  Let’s say you’ve got 900 followers, and one of them re-tweets your post to their 300 separate followers.  You’ve opened your chances of getting seen from 1/3 more of your own followers, and from one fan.  It’s extremely helpful, not to mention if your fan base is loyal enough, you can even trend your product locally for everyone to see on their home page.  Remember, this is ALL free.

So, to wrap this up, I found that Twitter isn’t the enemy.  It’s helped me keep up very closely with the DIY bands that I really like without having to go through an intense effort to get updates from them.  At the same time, it’s helped me stay in contact with a lot of people.  Of course there’s people on Twitter that tweet 100% bull-shit or re-tweet philosophy because they think they’re the next Confucious to their 2 followers.  Stuff like that exists on every platform: there’s really no escaping that one person eventually, but hey, you can always un-follow them.  Personal Twitters can be great when you want to establish that artist-to-fan relationship.

Oh dang!  Eric had eggs for breakfast again! BIG @#!$#ING SURPRISE.

Oh dang! Eric had eggs for breakfast again! BIG @#!$#ING SURPRISE.

So start now: You don’t even need to start tweeting or anything of the sort.  It’s just very helpful to get your domain set so that you can use it any time in the future.  Just remember that it just could be that helpful edge you get down the road.  And hey, as far as that mysterious rockstar thing goes, most professional Twitters of the big stars aren’t even running their Twitters: it’s usually just a social media promotions guy taking control of it.

If you haven’t noticed yet, I’ve always signed off with my name, so don’t think this is some advertising, it’s just habitual.  Til next time

– @NishadGeorge

Hunx and His Punx Wish you the Gayest of Holidays!!!

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Need a last minute holiday gift for your little nephew? Hunx and his Punx have just the thing! Leader of a queercore band with a small but fervent following, this amazing individual is rolling out his wares for all to enjoy! Well, maybe not all… Anyway, he makes to-die-for music, (check out ‘Private Room’); he has been featured by Pitchfork and his YouTube views are nothing to joke about. More importantly, he is quite the business man: there’s a web series, the self-indulgent Hollywood Nailz; he makes holiday specific songs for purchase (imagine what he did for Halloween- he didn’t want to suck your ‘blood’, let’s just say) and now he is further expressing himself with a store full of paraphernalia including the above magnets, DVD Limited Edition DVD, and his impossible to find “Gay Singles” French CD! It’s easy to take this artist lightly; that’s the point. Regardless, his vision is clear: Upon introduction to this genius, you enter a world of fantasy, sex and egregious nonsense that is impossible to ignore. Now you and yours can have a little piece of it in your home, too. Just visit http://www.clearwackywacko.bigcartel.com to be a part of it all. Help Hunx and all of his Punx have a holiday full of…whatever it is that they do. Cheers!

My Tour Manager: Another Step Towards the DIY World

My Tour Manager: Another Step Towards the DIY World

I will say, I’ve taken quite a satirical approach to the music business in my previous posts.  Contract riders, punk bands, and social media for annoying your friends: they were, and were meant to be, very casual and fun reads meant purely for reader enjoyment along with an informative touch.  Today, however, I’ll bring up something nifty but more towards the realm of serious.

Today, getting those gigs isn’t any easier than it was a few years ago.  With Livenation and AEG dominating the touring world, the common DIY punk band will scratch their head and go, “Well, I guess I’ll just have to start using the phone and calling up some venues.”  There’s nothing wrong with that, it’s the way I’ve done it and it’s the way it’s gotta be done to get your foot in the door and your name out.  After all, if every no name up and coming band could score the big gig that Lady Gaga could score, everyone would be musicians.  To quote an incredibly cheesy and overly abused rock and roll quote, it’s (always) “a long way to the top if you want to rock and roll.”

However, with everything getting so digital these days, why can’t the booking process be digital?  That’s where My Tour Manager kicks in.  This is a touring site based in France, so it’s not quite released out to the English (or other) language speaking worlds.  Basically, the way this site works is that you get to choose your shoes as the tour manager/booking agent, or as the artist looking for gigs.  You register onto the site, and then, if you choose the shoes of an artist, locate concert venues and promoters to get a booking.  If you are the agent, it’s the opposite: you get to look through the selection of registered artists on the site and it’s smooth sailing from there.  This is virtually the Craigslist without the creepy sections and black and white format.  It’s a neat flashy way to get it across.  If you’ve found other sites dedicated to booking artists, you’ll find that they are not usually organized or do not give you the option of presenting yourself in a flashy and interesting way.

While this site is great, it is not truly optimal.  Again, it’s France based.  It is, on the other hand, a step in the right direction.  From here on out, it’s all digital, and we have to face that; so why not take advantage of that fact, face it, and use it to get solutions in the future?  If this is one site, why not create more flashy online booking sites?  Has no one thought of integrating social media for bands into an online entity?  This is the future of the DIY artist.  Yes, digital has wrecked the old music business model, but it has opened many doors for recognition from the bands that we’d always whine “deserved more credit.”  

Sites like this are just the beginning.  The more we progress into the future, the more the independent, DIY artist is able to expand his reach just a little more.  Does this mean that majors are truly outdated?  Not exactly.  To be honest, the worldwide promotion you get from major companies could also be combined with this digital age.  It’s really up to the band in the end.  Regardless, no band starts out signed to a major record label with global reach in this age: so online booking sites are critical.  I’m eager to an age where you can contact everyone that you need to book for a tour from your bedroom.  Could it ever be that simple?