JUKEBUS SESSIONS: Micro-Indie Concerts On The Road

Jukebus is an innovative project that consists of micro concerts performed by independent bands and singers inside public buses during a normal trip for the duration of one song. The concept is to change the conditions of the common users bringing them a unique and up-close, musical experience.  Furthermore, the concerts have an added value, which is the element of surprise. The concerts are not announced although social network followers may have some clues about them.

Valencia is the city with more musicians per capita within the Iberian Peninsula. It has several music conservatories and houses the prestigious Berklee College of Music within the City of Arts and Sciences. The blend of local regional music like flamenco and international genres such as classical, jazz, pop and rock produces a unique music environment.

The funders and producers of this project, Ricardo Boluda and Johnny Kutnowki were inspired by the “Black Cab” sessions in London, and “A Trolley Show” in San Diego. In the city of Valencia, this project is supported by the EMT (municipal transportation company) and bandness.com, which is an emerging online music platform. These combined efforts try to achieve two objectives: to help promote new artists and involve this beautiful city as a co-protagonist of a ride.

The concept is pretty simple. At any bus stop a group of musicians get on the bus followed by the crewmembers with video cameras. This is also remarkable because all the concerts are recorded and streamed on line through jukebus tv channel. It has created an interactive connection between users, fans, and social media followers who can relive, comment and like any concert. Take a look at this video “The lake song”-short version- by Red Buffalo, a Valencian indie-folk band:

These micro-concerts are mainly created for young people and therefore social media plays a very important role in its success. Bandness.com, the online platform supporter of Jukebus, was created by Quique Belenguer in order to promote indie bands and establish a better way to relate with music fans. Presently it has more than 1,000 bands in its catalogue. Jukebus is the company in charge of developing the social media, recording, and streaming of the micro concerts. Click the links and keep in touch by Facebook, Twitter, youtube/jukebustv.

The other main partner of the project is EMT.  Its goal is to enforce a fresh-young-dynamic image within the population related with the service it provides. But there is also a social objective; to promote new music taking advantage of the big number of musicians in the city.  Alberto Mendoza, EMT’s CEO, expressed the following during the project’s kick off:

“The bands selected will perform only original compositions in order to please all bus users.”

I think this is a great idea and huge opportunity to bring out new bands and performers. The music industry is changing everyday and it is becoming more difficult to be signed by a record label. New music needs and deserves to be heard. It feels so good to watch entities not related with music such as EMT collaborating with media companies in order to help indie artist and promote their music. Well done!

Strategy: Inbound

Patrick…

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I’ve known this character since high school – he’s been one of my best friends of all time. We’ve been through a lot; we’ve spent entire weeks in beach cottages, occasionally leaving the brightly painted, two-room shack to go mini-golfing dressed as formally as our resources would allow. At one point in high school, we spent an entire day excused from classes with school administration defending our actions in fear of impending suspension and a noticeable blemish on our otherwise faultless school behavioral records. Patrick – like all the best artists – kept me on my toes, entertained me, and made every ounce of my participation in the friendship worth each successive moment of time spent.

(thanks buddy. this one goes out to you)

AHEM! There’s a big lesson to take in here! As an artist, you need to be like my good friend Patrick.

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I’ve said it before. Seth Godin has said it before. We know it by now – you’ve got to be something special! You’ve got to have that charm and that little something that can’t be found anywhere else. Patrick has that. He’s incontrovertibly been and will always be that guy. In addition to his unmistakably characteristic personality, he has yet another integral factor of success. He’s got the right kind of actual, physical, not-even-figurative presence.

Keep in mind; I’m not necessarily saying he was always around. That’s actually a mistake many artists make – overdoing it (Yes, there’s a possibility that posting a link to your latest “Work In Progress” on Soundcloud and urging me to forward it to my entire network more than once in an hour could be considered too much.) In fact, Patrick was usually late to arrive and would consistently get himself lost during group outings – requiring that my friends and I take the time to find him whenever he got distracted and wandered off. Instead, he had presence in that I always knew where to find him, he was always there when I needed him, and he was always wholeheartedly down for whatever adventure happened to be on the agenda for the day.

You see; Patrick remains (to this day) rather conveniently unlicensed and thus legally precluded from operating a motor vehicle. This means that whenever a friend or I wanted to see him, we knew where we could find him – his house.

Here’s where some of the teachings lie. As an artist, you should be just like him; be consistently available, always be energetic and excited for even the most mundane trips to CVS for allergy medication, and bring that characteristic personality only when I come to you – when you know it’s what I know I’m getting myself into.

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In marketing terms, this is called your inbound strategy. It’s to be coordinated with your outbound efforts (which include your overt, publicly promotional actions – more on this some day) to contribute to something called Integrated Marketing Communications, or IMC. Successfully integrated one’s inbound and outbound communications is like giving a body to a voice. It’s means that behind the shouts of publicity, there’s a stable foundation to back it up. It (most concretely) means that when people are looking for your music, your bio, your pictures, for you, they can do so easily. Seeing as we’re all living and breathing the Internet – yup – this pretty much means social media.

You’ll hear from some people these days how important it is to be “on social media.” Some of these will stress how you should be ubiquitous (everywhere) online so people can find you; I don’t really consider that true. You just need to be where you’re expected to be. This depends a lot on your particular situation, but your portfolio of online personas could include anything from an instagram account to a reddit account. I don’t doubt that you have the clarity to know your fans well enough to know where they hang out online!

While you’re racking your brain – here’s a few tips.

Buy the Domain Name Already.

If you haven’t already…

Even if it’s just for posting songs with a nice Ken Burns slideshow of pictures, YouTube is great to be available on.

Do you have a nice e-mail address?

Do your fans use Pinterest? Be on Pinterest.

Learn to use hootsuite.

MySpace integrates well with a lot of other services these days – give it a thought, but it’s not too necessary. 

——–

What you say about yourself isn’t nearly as important as what people say about you. Sometimes it’s a good idea to keep quiet and let the dialogue flow. Although content is king, your posts are mini forums for conversation – not a dumping ground or an obligation.

———

One last thing. Respond to people.

Why Twitter is Necessary in Today’s Music Industry

Twitter

It’s a bird, it’s a plane, it’s… a completely irrelevant thought that sounds like a diary entry!  Yes, that’s Twitter to the common eye.  Believe me, for the longest time I thought that Twitter was the one of the lamest things to ever hit the music industry.  I couldn’t wrap my head around it.  Why?

Well for one, I always thought that Facebook was a more varied version of it.  Why should you be limited to 140 characters to post, not have thumbnail displayed photo previews, why not have extra pages like downloads or band pages, and why not just freakin’ have some privacy?  I mean, what ever happened to the mysterious rock star?  The icon that was either so DIY or so busy that the only time you could see them and hear them talk was that magical hour and a half on stage?  That was a rock and roll icon to me.  They were a mystery until you had to go out to their live show.

Unfortunately, I got slapped in the face with reality when I found out that this is 2012, and the Backstreet Boys are way past the Backstreet Men phase, making me one old bastard for the times.  It came time that I had to embrace this fancy new technology of the youth, and I fumbled for a while until I figured out it’s pure gold in today’s industry

You could say I have no clue what the @#$% I'm doing.

You could say I have no clue what the @#$% I’m doing.

1)  Twitter maintains your relevance in every day.  We live in a generation of instant-gratification.  If you can’t appease your blood thirsty shirt-ripping music-pillaging hounds of fans, you can sure bet they’re going to go and feast on the next target they see since you’re clearly not putting out.  Before you know it, your fans forget about who you are just because you’re not updating them on a day to day basis.  You’d be surprised how true it is.

2) You can create a short statement swift to the point that’ll be immediately received by all.  While 140 characters seems constricting, it actually aids you, the reader, or your fans.  How often will your fans stop what they’re doing to read that giant Shakespearean essay you posted on Facebook?  Most likely, they’ll just skip through it; in fact they probably won’t even see it.  Twitter guarantees your tweets will appear in the streams of your followers (Unless they’re following an insane amount of tweeters), whereas Facebook posts actually have never reached more than an average of 15% of their fans.

Don't worry, we're not "liking" your photo of breakfast because we hate you, we just don't give a shit about you enough to show up in our feed.

Don’t worry, it’s not that we’re not “liking” your photo of breakfast because we hate you, we just don’t give a shit about you enough to have you show up in our feed.

3)  Searching buzzes on Twitter is more effective than using Google.  Please re-read that so you don’t assume I just said Twitter is better than Google for information.  I said searching for buzzes: do you know how many people tweet about the silliest things you can’t find on Google?  When Facebook was down, Google wasn’t telling me anything.  But all I had to do was search “Facebook” on Twitter; and I’ll tell you, Twitter exploded about it.  It’s not that Google fails or anything of the sort, it’s just that the way the search engine is configured, Twitter sifts through much less  and more relevant information to produce its Tweet results as opposed to Google.

4) In addition to #3, you can create the buzz yourself.  Trends and re-tweets are very helpful in that the fans do some of the promotion for you.  Let’s say you’ve got 900 followers, and one of them re-tweets your post to their 300 separate followers.  You’ve opened your chances of getting seen from 1/3 more of your own followers, and from one fan.  It’s extremely helpful, not to mention if your fan base is loyal enough, you can even trend your product locally for everyone to see on their home page.  Remember, this is ALL free.

So, to wrap this up, I found that Twitter isn’t the enemy.  It’s helped me keep up very closely with the DIY bands that I really like without having to go through an intense effort to get updates from them.  At the same time, it’s helped me stay in contact with a lot of people.  Of course there’s people on Twitter that tweet 100% bull-shit or re-tweet philosophy because they think they’re the next Confucious to their 2 followers.  Stuff like that exists on every platform: there’s really no escaping that one person eventually, but hey, you can always un-follow them.  Personal Twitters can be great when you want to establish that artist-to-fan relationship.

Oh dang!  Eric had eggs for breakfast again! BIG @#!$#ING SURPRISE.

Oh dang! Eric had eggs for breakfast again! BIG @#!$#ING SURPRISE.

So start now: You don’t even need to start tweeting or anything of the sort.  It’s just very helpful to get your domain set so that you can use it any time in the future.  Just remember that it just could be that helpful edge you get down the road.  And hey, as far as that mysterious rockstar thing goes, most professional Twitters of the big stars aren’t even running their Twitters: it’s usually just a social media promotions guy taking control of it.

If you haven’t noticed yet, I’ve always signed off with my name, so don’t think this is some advertising, it’s just habitual.  Til next time

– @NishadGeorge

“THE COST OF ACQUIRING A FAN”

Last day i received an email by Music Xray, an interesting platform who every week targets listeners for evaluating how they perceive the songs suggested. In the most of the cases it promotes major artists whose tracks are potential singles eventough still not huge in terms of popularity and listenings. The process starts with targeting a certain number of audience (40 – 60) and the final aim is to turn the participants into fans of the artist/band while providing a calculation related to the ratio of people following the artist. Thank’s to a click, they are added to the mailing list and considered “acquired fans”. However, the statistic takes into account also people who doesn’t click the song. The cost of acquired fan is $0,66 if just one of two users is following the songwriter, that’s because the platform charges him 0.33 for each potential fan and in exchange the artist will be given his email address and link for facebook profile. Once again is another tool for improving the realtionship between the two and it’s very useful for evaluating how fast a certain artist is able to acquire fans, in comparison with other competitors of the same music cathegory. In addition, the listeners are targeted regarding their tastes and the style preferred. Finally all that is measured will be the level of engagement and this is necessary for adding value to the music.

http://blog.musicxray.com/fan-appeal-stack-major-artists-easy/

MY SPACE AGAIN??

My Space’s decline was mainly due to a series of factors that didn’t make this tool as easy and comfortable as its main competitors Facebook and Soundcloud who has now become  one of the most popular music uploaders. Well, the chief executive is thinking about a new plan for giving a new light to the first significant social network of our generation. It’s hard to give more details about the strategy but the team anticipates its user value, who will be provided by a new experience and not just a duplication of the previous model. While his main competitors stand for streaming services as Spotify and Deezer, one competitive advantage will be the analytic system who is inglobed in it and allows to know “who’s listening to”. It’s not uncommon that an A&R, as in the past, could find this tool more suitable for music research and selection, and once again this could be another positive feature. Another component that provides a competitive advantage, will be the design content and in particular the component of “fun” who is represented in it. The new product is named Specific Media and and the main focus will be on music. In addition it can analyse, through its new technology, who are the most engaged artist’s fans.

However, there is still uncertainty regarding the future profitability of the platform but a new step towards an improvement of the relation between audience and artist seems to be the key factor.