From Musician to Cultural Icon in a Technology Driven Age

Have you ever stop to think about what it would be like if the everyone would simply embraced this technology driven age we live in instead of fighting it so much?

Amanda Palmer showed the world the beauty of embracing the unknown. She went from musician to cultural icon when her Kickstarter campaign raised 1.2k!! Pretty impressive, right? Watch her TED talk below as it will help you understand exactly what I mean.

“Palmer is set to join Radiohead and Nine Inch Nails as the artists people mention when they talk about the new music business.” — Billboard

While everyone constantly takes the time to put down the online world, and artists like Taylor Swift oppose tech driven services like Spotify for her own personal reasons, Amanda decided to embrace it all. She strongly believed that a strong relationship with her fans is what the music journey should always be about, and emphasized that this technology driven age can allow us all to create deep connections if we are willing to ask.

Palmer has become the poster girl for dipping not only your toe, but your whole body, because you never really know what will happen. In her case, the road less traveled led her to find incredibly positive results. Her kickstarter campaign, TED talk, recently published book, and unique music have all had great success because Amanda took a chance to welcome the changes the technology driven age has introduced instead of questioning them.

Amanda was strategic in her approach though. She made sure to establish a strong fan base before using technology to her advantage. In fact, it is her strong fan base that helped her raised 1.2k via Kickstarter. She beautifully mastered “the art of asking” as she likes to call it. She turned to her fans for help her and they provided more help than she ever imagined. It is very exciting to learn about her story however, it is also important to understand that not everyone will be able to do what she did. Because truth be told, there is only one Amanda Palmer.

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80% of the crowd funding campaigns that manage to be successful only raise about $10,000. This, however, is $10,000 more that artists can receive because of the changes this technology driven age has introduced. Crowd funding is not a magic path to stardom or riches. Artists must work extremely hard for crowd funding campaigns to succeed. Crowd funding platforms and success stories like Amanda Palmer do create a wonderful point though. Technology is not always evil. Technology can be an incredibly good ally. It can allow artists to use the power of music combined with the power of fans to acquire additional funding. Changes like these are why technology continues to shape the music industry.

2014-11-30_16.14.19

New Zealand #2

36 weeks in the US Billboard’s Hot 100, Top 10 in Portugal and Israel, #1 in Canada, Australia Ireland, South Africa,Austria and of course in New Zealand. The band  OMC  released in December 1995 single “How Bizarre” with the song with the same name and made a big “boom” in the music industry of their Country.

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That’s a small history with the big impact that this country had in the music, of course there are much more but this ones interested me the most. An other thing is that they also have their own Music Award since 1965, this award show is presented by Record New Zealand is a non-profit trade association of record producers, distributors and artists recording who sell music in New Zealand. (http://www.nzmusicawards.co.nz/).

There is also a big campaign that started in 2001  called About New Zealand music Month this showcased on radio and television and in live performances, this happens each may. This has helped music on commercial radio stations to increased dramatically from around 10% in 2000 to nearly 23% in 2005. The amount of New Zealand music sold had also grown, from 5.45% of the total market in 2000 to over 10% by 2004. Us you can read NZ has a big industry and they make it happen. Here is a link so you can find 31 one different stories about NZ music.

http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/culture/love-new-zealand-music

http://www.nzmusicmonth.co.nz/what-is-nz-music-month/

“The Vision of the Music Commission is a successful music industry in New Zealand.”

Music Commission

Music as a Muse: “The Last Waltz”

last waltz

November 25, 1976.  Thanksgiving Day in San Francisco.  Rock group, The Band, is preparing to make their swan song.  Their farewell concert in the same venue in which they made their debut, The Winterland Ballroom.  Martin Scorsese was there recording the whole thing as an A list of musical stars take the stage to join The Band in their final performance as, well, The Band.

When I say the A list, I mean a truly all-star cast including (but not even closed to limited to) Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Emmylou Harris, Ringo Starr, Van Morrison, Neil Diamond and Eric Clapton, just to name a handful accompanying The Band, horn section and choir.


The Band ft Bob Dylan – Forever Young

The film also shares some insightful interviews with the band members.  A tidbit from an interview with Robbie Robertson that I found notable was that they were are one of the few bands of the era that simply retired.  There was no tragic drug overdose killing the frontman–although drug use was rampant.  The producers had to edit out a glob of cocaine that was.hanging from Neil Young’s nose. (Freep.com)  There was no power struggle and Yoko incited breakup.  They didn’t milk their fame playing concerts at geriatric homes forty years past their prime.  They simply retired upon the realization that they had been on the road for 16 years and were ready to do something new, nothing more.  They went out with a bang, and that was what this concert was all about.

Over thirty years later, this film is widely recognized as one of the greatest music documentaries of all time.  However, Levon Helm, drummer and vocalist of The Band, expresses reservations about it in his biography, saying that Scorsese made Robertson the protagonist of the film and did not portray the synergy of the group. (Chicagotribune.com)

I shall conclude this series with an epic guitar battle between Robbie Robertson and Eric Clapton.  Enjoy.

Snarky Puppy ft. Jayna Brown – I’ll Do Me – Family Dinner Volume One

Music:

Most of the music-savvy folks out there already know the name of Snarky Puppy. The band has pretty much become a benchmark in terms of jazz bands and they truly deserve the exposure. The individual level of proficiency that the members demonstrates can certainly account for that. All of their albums are recorded and filmed live, and the band director and composer, Michael League shows-off his genius on every occasion. This song, I’ll Do Me, is a blues tune. It’s not the usual style that Snarky usually performs in, they’re more of the big band type of register. But this whole album is more than just Snarky Puppy. Family Dinner volume 1 showcases talent from the MusicLab at the Jefferson Center in Roanoke, VA. and plays arrangements of one of each guest’s songs; the result is phenomenal. Back to this song however. The tune was written by a 12 year old girl named Jayna Brown and boy can she sing. She belts it like she has had a lifetime of experience at singing blues. Gabriel Morales, a 15 year-old guitar student, also from the Jefferson Center, joins her and takes a solo that is all blues and taste. It is truly amazing to see two young musicians playing alongside others twice their age, and show an equal level of musicianship. It is also reassuring and comforts the idea that not all talented young musicians set themselves on a path to become the next Bieber or Cyrus and grow up to get in fights with paparazzis or do drugs on stage. But this is another battle.

Video:

The whole concept for this DVD stays true to the vibe Snarky usually sets for their live recordings and even brings it forward. The live setup usually consists of the 20+ piece-band playing in a circle around a reduced crowd of 25 (or so) people. This time the band is set on a stage, and the crowd is scattered around it and sat on living room sofas and comfy cushioned chairs. Half of this record was shot and recorded on the one evening. On the second evening, around 800 people were invited to attend the performance, recording, and video shoot session. The vibe that seeps out is that of a cosy evening at a local jazz bar, minus the gin & tonic. And the picture matches the quality of the music, it captures the atmosphere perfectly and complements it with slow pans and occasional close-ups of players pulling faces that evoke groove and concentration.

Definitely a band to check out if you haven’t already, and this encompasses the entirety of their music. They touch upon all styles of grooves and melodies, and have just enough jazz to get the undivided attention of most musicians without losing that of non-players who aren’t generally attracted to that type of music.

Music Video of the Week : Justin Timberlake’s ‘Tunnel Vision’

Music :

While this song is not the hit single of JT’s the 20/20 experience album, it definitely stands out as a quality track. It was written and produced by Timberlake, Timbaland, James Fauntleroy, and Jerome Harmon. It features audible content from Timbaland who lent his signature beat-making and beat-boxing skills for the creation of this track.

The instrumental strikes as quite sinister right from the start. It builds off an overdriven vocal sample, what sounds like a vacuous trumpet-like melodic line and a high pitched arpeggio. After a few bars they give into into a bass-heavy beat with clear-cut side stick hits and some of Timbaland’s infamous ad-libs and vocal scratch sounds. On the vocal front JT taps into both his lower and higher vocal ranges throughout and shows he is comfortable in either of the two, adding to the dramatic effect of the song.  His arpeggiated backing vocals echo the layered soundscape created by Timbaland. This indubitably allows them to feed off one another as far as creative techniques and arrangement go.

With regards to the lyrical content, JT talks about this ‘Tunnel Vision’ he has for his love interest, describing his infatuation in almost voyeuristic terms. His writing echoes his previous works in some ways; lyrical themes from ‘Cry Me a River’ or ‘My Love’ appear throughout this track.

Video :

The suave grey texture of the video matches the sinister vibe of the track. JT shows off his sweet moves that he is already quite known for and uses the syncopated beats to the advantage of his choreography. The ‘cool’ factor of the video is Timbaland appearance – or more accurately his mouth – beat-boxing along to the song. The more controversial element of the song comes in then. Timberlake decided to venture in the nude-art territory when he decided to have topless women feature in this music video. Not only are these women topless, but he dances fully clothed alongside them via projector montage. The video had to be taken off Youtube a few hours after its release and re-submitted with a content warning page to filter the traffic to the video. Now this may not be unpleasant to the majority of the male population viewing this video, however it feels a bit ‘déja-vu’ to have a playboy-looking type artist dancing alongside topless models.

Robin Thicke and Pharrell used this concept over the summer to release the video for their song ‘Blurred Lines’. It feels like the video to their song acts more as a sales tool than anything else though. The women casted for the part – very attractive albeit – are more there for show it feels. Thicke played off of the summer vibe and used this as a marketing technique; the ladies are walking around, topless, and randomly-timed hashtag words flash up on the screen in the hopes of brainwashing the audience. This is where JT differentiates his approach. The models are not striking random poses like they’re part of the furniture, they’re supplely dancing with a more ‘artsy’ feel to it. Kaleidoscopic patterns are projected overtop of them all the while and lyrics appear on the backdrop in a blended and non-aggressive, non-promotional way. Once again, the male population watching the video might not be complaining. But unfortunately, because of the length of the track the concept loses impact a good minute or two before the video ends.

Tunnel Vision :

Executive Producer: Jeff Nicholas
Produced by Jonathan Craven and Nathan Scherrer
Directed by Jonathan Craven, Simon McLoughlin and Jeff Nicholas for The Uprising Creative
Director Of Photography: Sing Howe Yam
Editor: Jacqueline London

 

Lawyers in the Music Industry

Seeing as we missed this class due to the Mama Event, (a great cause no doubt) I figured I’d take matters into my own hands and learn/blog about something I’m personally interested in. Maybe those of us who were in Paris can get the gist of what we missed.

First things first. Not common to popular belief, lawyers are wonderful, compassionate and charitable people in the music industry. I’m not very good at being sarcastic in writing yet but nonetheless, I suppose that could be true if personal incentives aren’t taken into consideration. Unfortunately, we live in a time where these bastards are truly needed in practically every aspect of an artists career, (and anyone else in the industry for that matter) and boy do they know it. I say unfortunately because this makes them extremely valuable and necessary and it always sucks to be that dependent on something. Even so,  what is always important to remember is that the lawyer works for the artist, not the other way around.

With that out of the way, the point is that hopefully after reading this you won’t be able to justify their existence, but rather you will definitely be able to understand their purpose. How’s that? Off we go!

What does a lawyer do?

The most obvious role of the lawyer is to be involved anywhere that an artist is potentially generating income. And anywhere an artist is potentially generating income, there will be a contract or an agreement needed. And when a contract or an agreement is needed a lawyer should be involved. So as you can see from the lovely circle of reasoning here, they exist because they are needed and they are needed because they exist.

Other than negotiating contracts and working with you and literally every other member of your team they (the good ones) also act as reliable A&R persons for labels. Lawyers are involved with everyone in the industry, so they know everyone in the industry, and that means they have some clout that, in the early stages at least, the artist probably doesn’t. A good lawyer promotes the acts that he/she truly believes in, to the labels and actually wants them to be successful. Why do they do this? Quite simply because the more successful the artist, the more successful the lawyer.  In other words they want the artist to do good, so they can make more money from them. Labels know this so it is easy for them to seriously consider the acts recommended by lawyers. Lawyers won’t just submit any shitty band to a label because that devalues their judgement in the eyes of the label. If a lawyer only submits artists that truly have potential, the label will love them and take every recommendation seriously.

The lawyer can also play an active role in putting together an artists’ business team which brings us to the next point.

When is a lawyer necessary?

Many people think (at least I did) that lawyers don’t come into play until much later down the road in an artists career but that isn’t necessarily the case. Lawyers can be an important member of the band’s team during it’s initial formation (so basically, when the band should be dealing with the band agreement).

Furthermore, since lawyers have so many connections it is often the case that a band hires a lawyer before they even have a manager, let alone any other member of their team. Hiring a lawyer before agreements with these members even exist makes sense because a lot of the time it can be the lawyer that finds the manager, agent, business manager, and so on for the artist in the first place. Look at it this way, an ethical label won’t let an artist sign without a lawyer. Even if you have a manager, but no lawyer, they won’t sign you. And if they do they are probably assholes that are trying to take advantage of you in a deal, so be wary of that if you are an artist.

Alright, we have established that it can be a good idea for an artist to hire a lawyer early in their careers. But good lawyers have the power to be selective. So in a weird way in order for the artist to have a good lawyer, they need to deserve one. Because of the role that lawyers play in A&R the good lawyer must be interested in the band, as I mentioned earlier, he/she must believe in the bands potential and work ethic. This means that once the artist has some stable ground under them in terms of songs written, demos recorded, and a small promo package, it can be a great time to get a great lawyer. I know this sounds contradicting to the statement of getting them as early as the band agreement, but you can always hire a lawyer on an hourly basis to deal with the band agreement, and have no other involvement with the band until the band feels they are ready enough to go for a great lawyer, or at least hire one full time.

How can an artist find a great lawyer?

The simple answer is look for one. Talk to local bands that seem to have their shit together. Find a band that you like and look inside their album to find a name that has ‘Esq.’ after it. Look for them online as there are several legal directories available. Most importantly, interview them. Ask them what experience they have in the music industry specifically, and if they foresee any conflicts of interest with other clients. Finally ask them how, and how much they bill you. Which leads us to the final part.

How does a lawyer get paid?

This is one aspect where they can get just as creative as any of the artists they are signing! I’ll briefly and simply try to outline the four main ways they like to take their money.

Hourly – usually $150-$600 per hour. The extremely expensive ones are usually only dealing with big acts and even bigger labels.

Percentage – 5%-10% of income generated from the deal they worked on/negotiated. When dealing with percentages the lawyer takes the money from the net artist share, not the gross money received. ***This type of billing is very common. It can technically be paid by the label through the artists’ personal advance; which makes it recoupable against artist royalties.

Hybrid – At first they charge a (relatively) low hourly fee and then take a percentage later once things get going. I recommend this way ideally, for a beginning act.

Value-Billing – This one is pretty abstract. It is based on this: the more “value” the lawyer helped you get in a deal, the more they get paid.

At they end of the day it all comes down to the fact that the more money the artist is making, the more money the lawyer is making.

Final Note

It is in the best interest of the artist to have the same lawyer for as much of their career as possible. You get to know them and yes, can eventually build trust. As an artist always remember the lawyer works for you, and at the end of the day they can be the only ones who can save your ass. Anyways, I hope you learned something from this post.

Love them or hate them, lawyers are not going anywhere fast and they play a massive and distinctly important role in the careers of anyone and everyone involved in the music industry.

Phillip Richard

Sources and Further Reading:

All you need to know about the music industry by Donald Passman.

http://d83mezhuhqi17.cloudfront.net/76/05/57/3956967?Expires=1353662961&Signature=Eln4vmkeSHIlfD8LGdxv6-wMGOsp5oPLPx8~HiqDkeB23z3gr-N9IezlzFsklm~7KWDuhFofBXb9tlqcKhMt~5~DwzUZk8DYQiArSX76FQ3RMaQzjDFnPSlxSe38weiJJc6-csCUPw-EEdS70rARvE~r8CrWigGqlmfXpH-D3YQ_&Key-Pair-Id=APKAIVZN4AJ762UIENTQ

Google Plus as a Marketing Tools for artist management

Mayday official on Google Plus had announced a very exciting news for their fans (included me!!!) that they are having a live performance at Google main office at California, USA and an activity ” Mayday takes you to Google”been organised for only Google Plus user will have the chance to win the flight ticket to USA through posting the creative photo. In the description of youtube, there is a good introduction for my favorite rock band- Mayday and the reason why they are famous!!!

After seeing the success of facebook platform, Google intend to create their own social network. After the failure of launching Open Social, they had launched Google Plus at 28th June 2011 and seems like they operated it pretty well by using the strong marketing strategy – collaborated with artist in different region that have huge fan base to become the spokesman of google plus by targeting their fan as potential google plus user and artist can get more benefit from managing the personal official website by interacting more potential fan from Google Plus user and increase reputation through worldwide, which creates a win-win strategy!!

For instance, in Taiwan, Mayday is the main spokesman who have an enormous fan database around the world and i am one of them that been attracted to join Google Plus. For fans, is not only about getting the latest information of the band but also the sense of achievement that we could do something for our favourite band. For instance,the official Google Plus of Mayday had announced that when the followers of Mayday Official Google Plus website had exceed 120,000, google will selected a fans and sponsor them to go USA with Mayday for their live performance in Google main office which is the activities i mentioned above; exceed 200,000 then Mayday will invited 9 fans from Google Plus and having a video chat gathering with them through Google Plus function- hangouts. This again created a win-win strategies by leads user familiar to the google plus function and also artist is building relationship with their fans.

As Vic Gundotra, the Senior Vice President of Engineering for Google, had announced a new milestone for Google+: 400 million registered users and 100 million monthly active users at 17th September 2012. Google Plus might have the potential to become the next Facebook or beyond it through their multi function and artist will do the tutorial for those function that create buzz!!! The amount of user may still increased and as the success story of artist get benefit from Google Plus such as Mayday, many artist can build their fan database might follow this marketing strategy path by building their own Google Plus Artist page. There are two website that provide good explanation that why google plus is a good marketing tools for artist and how to build the Google Plus artist page:

http://zero2illo.com/tips-on-google-for-illustrators-and-artists/

http://zero2illo.com/tips-on-google-for-illustrators-and-artists/

 

If anyone interested in Mayday, i have lots of information to provide!

Reference:

http://thenextweb.com/google/2012/09/17/as-predicted-google-passes-400m-registered-users-now-100m-monthly-active-users/

http://techorange.com/2012/04/19/google-power-up-plus-mayday-help-to-get-eyeball/

Band Agreements – Four Things you Definitely Want Covered

Poor Robin

With all this talk about contracts between artists and managers and agents and promoters and publishers and record labels and all kinds of other money grabbing people and things, it becomes easy to overlook one of the most important and fundamental  agreements a band can have: the band agreement. The band agreement is exactly what it sounds like – an agreement between the band members that outlines the business aspects of their art. I know that for all the cool kids out there that are in bands with their BFF’s because their ‘vibe is just so pure and wonderful and it’s all about the music, not the money’ – this doesn’t apply, you guys just high five and call it a day. But, for anybody else here are some things you might want to consider about the band agreement.

First of all this is something that should get done in the very early stages of the band. It brings up very important questions that you normally wouldn’t necessarily think of. These are best discussed when there isn’t too much money coming in (or any at all) and everybody in the band still loves each other. This just ensures everything gets done in an easy and friendly way. Sometimes it is difficult to bring up depressing things like breakups and it might be a good idea to hire a lawyer to overlook the whole process and bring up the negative stuff for you. You may never need the agreement but it will definitely be better to have it rather than not.

So we have established that they should be done in the early stages and that they might never even be used but what exactly should the band agreement entail, what questions should get asked? Here is a summary of Martin Frascogna’s four things that should always be covered at a minimum level and I think these are pretty good starting points.

1. Decide How the Band and Will Decide

For any decisions the band makes from buying new equipment or software to who to hire as a manager, there should be a defined way that they are made. A simple vote makes sense but what if the band has an even number of members and the vote comes in 50/50? Furthermore try and think about which decisions will require a unanimous vote and decide who has the power to break a tie based on things like financial investments and individual workload.

2. Income Structure

When the band makes money where does that money go? With certain income streams and depending on other contracts you might not have a choice but for when you do have a choice this comes in handy. Do all members get a cut? Is some of the income put aside for investments in the band? Establish who the songwriters are, in other words if you register a song for copyright (or a creative commons license woop woop!) Whose name is it registered under; the band as a whole or a certain individual?

3. Trademark

Who owns the band name? If you assume everyone shares equal parts that means 3 people could leave a band that originally had 5 members and start using the name. In a weird way them quitting would be like the other two getting fired. Figure out what you want because once a band gets started they will be spending a lot of effort and resources in branding themselves and getting the name out there/developing a fan base. There is a lot at stake with band names and trademarks so it is important to discuss the best way to go about it. If this isn’t determined often times a court will decide that no one can continue using the name and then both sides get screwed out of it. Furthermore, if your band has registered the name and somewhere down the road you come into contact with someone else who has the exact same name but isn’t registered, you can probably guess who wins and get’s to keep it.

4. Jurisdiction

The band needs to know under what laws their disputes (if any) will be governed. If you ever need to go to court will it need to be in California? or Massachusetts? or Valencia? This are more important than one thinks. If you live in Boston and you have a deal with some company in Los Angelas, that says your jurisdiction is in California you would need to  pay California Courts, travel expenses to and from LA, and you might even need to deal with different laws you were unaware of. In any case, make sure you pick a home base!

Remember that a band agreement is as important as any other contract and the earlier it gets done the less painful and expensive it will be for everyone if you ever need it. As a manager this should be one of the first things you organize for a band if they don’t already have it.

Phillip Richard

Sources and Further Reading:

http://blog.midem.com/2012/06/martin-frascogna-4-minimum-requirements-for-artist-agreements/#.UIgyFLTevWY

http://www.themusiciansguide.co.uk/blog/13/why-you-need-a-band-agreement-contract-guest-post-by-daniel-ward/

http://www.digitalmusicnews.com/stories/020311samename

Kenting Music Festival- Spring Scream

Once a year, an epic adventure of art and audio aspiration hits the island and drags everyone to the Kenting Light house for amazing vacation of music and arts and life.

The music festival will be detailedly introduced at the below statement, participants of this major event are not restricted by age or ethnicity. Music lovers fly halfway across the globe just to support local performers in Taiwan. Music bands take advantage of this opportunity to release, promote and exchange their works, and at the same time exhibit their individual styles and affluent creativity. Each year, the organizers invite many foreign composers and independent bands in Taiwan to perform. Artists may also register to perform at the event, making the Spring Scream Festival more universal, diverse and radiant.

Since the first Spring Scream in 1995 up until today, 17 years have passed, making this the longest running major music festival in the history of Taiwan.  Spring Scream is also the largest scale and most widely known international music and arts festival in Taiwan, setting new records time and time again.  With over 200 domestic and international bands performing over the course of a 4 day festival, to this day no one else can compete.  Spring Scream’s roots are planted deep in the heart of Taiwan, and it is praised as an established cultural asset to the region.
Innovation promotes diversity in the local creative music and performance arts scene.
Through support and encouragement, an opportunity to perform and participate, and through independent promotion and a mutual exchange of ideas, Taiwan’s local performers, bands, artists, and a multitude of dedicated fans are challenged to expose their abundant creativity, utilizing the festival to let themselves shine.
Competitions are hosted by the festival for short films, art films, documentaries, and animation. There is a stage dedicated to the broadcasting of music or art films, short films and animations. Various arts and crafts booths are set up for installation art, graffiti, action art, and handcraft market, as well as booths for self-created brands, food and cuisine, sports and leisure, self-designed clothing, handmade products, creative markets, and custom art clothing.

These ideas originate from the event’s founders and their love for art and music. Not only does the event provide a stage for local music bands and artists to perform, many foreign individuals and bands are also given the opportunity to participate in this arts and music feast. Furthermore, music enthusiasts are exposed to a wide range of music genres. This unique southern Taiwan music hall attracts thousands of people each year.

Music lovers from all corners of the earth, embrace the natural environment, share, support each other, create harmony in the surrounding community, encourage and engage in environmental protection, protect those less fortunate and support women and children rights groups, care for homeless animals, and show compassion for community public welfare movements!

[  Origin ]

Spring Scream started small in 1995 by Wade and Jimi… “It’s just gotten bigger and better.”  Last year of the Rabbit 2011 should see over 200 performers on 7 stages.  Emphasis is on music, but we strive to make it a place where art meets life and artists live together in nature for a couple days.If we could go back in time to 1995, Kenting was still a simple and innocent place.  It was the 6th year of the Golden Melody Awards, the best male singer was Jonny Yin, best female singer was Stella.  The best Taiwanese singer was Jacky Wu.Back then, Taiwanese society thought the words “independent band” sounded strange, and had no idea what a “music festival” was.

By 1999, the number of bands applying to play at Spring Scream had increased to over 100 bands.  Nearby restaurants had unlimited business, and other separate festivals using the same name started popping up.  You could say, people started to get mixed up about which was the original Spring Scream Music festival.

Any Berklee Student or their band wanna participate on it?! Just book a ticket to Taiwan for Spring 2013!

Sources:

http://www.springscream.com/sample-page

http://www.taiwan.gov.tw/ct.asp?xItem=66288&CtNode=2953&mp=10002