RECORD LABEL PRACTICUM Blog 1. Midem By Chris Uribe

RECORD LABEL PRACTICUM

Blog 1. Midem

By Chris Uribe

 

Introduction

 

I arrived the first day without knowing what to expect and without a specific plan to follow. I’ve been in some music conventions before so I thought, “let’s play by ear”. By noon I had a schedule of the people I wanted to hear in the different forums, I made some appointments and I felt ready to live the experience, learn as much as possible, and start networking.

Lyor Cohen

 

There are some points I liked from this talk (besides the photos) that I want to underscore. First, he said that independent must be a business but he knows that building a business is not easy. The mission is to create a long and lasting statement beyond the music, which doesn’t lack internal and external order. In addition, as a risk taken, he stated that is hard to understand what he calls the “resistance of good”.  When something is good most of the people try to remain in this comfort zone instead of continuing to grow. For him, it’s crucial to make good great, and make great magnificent.

 

He also underlined the importance of his collaboration with MIT and Berklee as a means to understand web music related data in an efficient way which can be useful for the music industry. He pointed out the potential benefits of alliances with new tech company developers and the music industry providing the example of his collaboration with Google as an investor and twitter as an important partner in management.

 

He concluded saying that he is really open to hear and promote new artists for his new-INDEPENDENT company “300” which opened on November 2013. This company is composed of a small group of “smart and winner people” within the music industry who are leading careers of artists such as Jason Mraz.

 

Mark Taylor

 

We are in a world where anyone has a voice and wants to be heard. The main question is how we can be listened when we live immersed in the noise of tons of content, tools, apps, post, blogs, streams, etc. The point is not only to be different but also to be able to make differentiation from others. To get attention and loyalty is even harder  when the goal is to make profit in this new-era of marketing.

 

 

 

I was really surprised with this young entrepreneur, Director of the digital marketing company Venture Harbor, and consultant in more of 500 agencies digital marketing strategies. “Wow! This is what it could mean to be different,” I thought.

 

He still believes that Facebook is the most important viral social network. The difference in content is not enough to stand out in a crowd. In this ocean full of tons of information the content must be emotionally stimulating and remarkable. He used the example of Lady Gaga’s marketing plan, which is based in constantly attracting the attention and bringing new thing to audiences.

 

Conclusion

 

I was amazed to see how many independent labels, entrepreneurs, new companies, Ministries of Culture, and a wide diversity of artists get together to create networks that will build the future of the global music industry. After see the representatives of Argentina, Brazil, Chile Cuba, Spain etc., my personal questions were: Where is Mexico? Where are the musicians who complain about and against big companies because of the lack of opportunities? Where are those companies that own the local market and are supposed to be music dealers? Mexico has musicians who are capable of performing at the highest level in the world. The problem is that they have to survive within a local industry that is not interested in playing in the big leagues. I was very disappointed by the absence of my country in this conference and the consequences that this has for the music industry. My only hope is that Mexico could be part in the future of this “New music industry world” and its independent artists make their music heard beyond their local boundaries.

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